Government Without Restraints?

Heather Cox Richardson’s most recent newsletter was disturbing, to say the least. Since many (most?) of you read her contributions, you may have already seen what I’m about to share.

She starts her newsletter thus:

As the Biden administration sets out to restore a government that can regulate business to level the playing field in the United States between workers and employers, address inequality, and combat climate change, Republicans are turning to the courts to stop him.

The rest of her newsletter describes the many and various congressional actions the Republicans are putting forth to thwart Biden’s plan to foster equality.

As I read her remarks related to Republican actions, I kept asking myself, is this the best way to run a country of several million people? Removing the many and various regulations that are designed to level the playing field between the common people and Big Business?

I won’t go into the several actions being taken by the Republicans to accomplish their goal since she thoroughly outlines them in her newsletter. But I will say this: I was pretty astounded to read all that they’re doing. I suppose I shouldn’t be … but still, it’s often difficult to understand their point of view.

In essence, it sounds to me like they would be happy if the U.S. just abolished the Constitution. In fact, Heather reports that Justice Elena Kagan commented that some of their proposals would essentially mean that “most of Government is unconstitutional.”

Heather sums it up …

But that, of course, is the point. We are caught up in a struggle between two ideologies: one saying that the government has a significant role to play in keeping the playing field level in the American economy and society, and the other saying it does not.

One can’t help but wonder where all this will end up.

How Much Is Enough?

“Ark,” of A Tale Unfolds fame (or is that infamy?) and photographer extraordinaire, made this comment on another blog and it intrigued me enough to write a short post about it.

Cultural background may well be the reason why some feel they need a paragraph or more to express an idea.

As many who regularly visit my blog already know, I’m not a fan of lengthy blog comments (or blog posts either, for that matter). Although it’s not my practice to moderate visitor remarks, I concede that I do occasionally share my preference-for-less-words to the “offender.”

I have, at times, wondered why the sheer number of words disturbs me so. Perhaps my discomfort harkens back to a high school English teacher who taught me that too many written words tend to become superfluous. Her admonition sank deep and ever since then, I’ve made a concerted effort to be economical in my writing – and perhaps this is why it vexes me when others are not.

Anyway, going back to Ark’s comment – why do you feel some individuals feel the need to write lengthy discourses when sharing their viewpoint? Is it a cultural thing, as he suggests? Or is it because the writer feels they must “explain” things in order to be fully understood?  Or are some individuals simply long-winded?

Please be aware this post is not directed at any particular individual(s) … however, if you feel a nudge as you’re reading it, there could be a reason. 😉

Christianity and QAnon

Brent Stirton/Getty Images

Some of you may have already seen this, but if not, it’s definitely worth a read:

Pastors are leaving their congregations after losing their churchgoers to QAnon

On the morning of the Capitol riot, Vern Swieringa told his wife during a walk with their dogs: “Something is going to happen today. I don’t know what, but something’s going to happen today.”

The Christian Reformed Church pastor from Michigan had been watching for months as some members of his congregation grew captivated by videos about the QAnon conspiracy theory on social media, openly discussing sex trafficking and Satan-worshipping pedophiles.

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So when hundreds of President Donald Trump’s supporters stormed the Capitol hours after his premonition, Swieringa was shocked, but not surprised.

“I think some of the signs had been there all along, and it just all came to a perfect storm,” Swieringa told Insider.

Even more startling is the following from the article:

[A} survey by the conservative American Enterprise Institute found that more than a quarter of white evangelical respondents believed in QAnon and that three in five believed that President Joe Biden’s win in the 2020 election was “not legitimate.” 

Much of this smacks of Christian Nationalism, which some of you have spoken out against. Let me assure you, it is a very real movement. I won’t address it here, but urge anyone who is not familiar with their goals to do the research. Wikipedia is a good place to start. You may also want to read this article.

Have You Heard This One?

During one of his campaign trips Donald Trump is visiting an elementary school and goes into one of the classes. They are in the middle of a discussion related to words and their meanings.

The teacher asks Mr. Trump if he would like to lead the discussion of the word “Tragedy.” So he asks the class for an example of a tragedy.

One little boy stands up and offers: “If my best friend who lives on a farm, is playing in the field and a runaway tractor comes along and knocks him dead, that would be a tragedy.”

“No,” says Mr. Trump, “that would be an accident.”

A little girl raises her hand: “If a school bus carrying 50 children drove over a cliff, killing everyone inside, that would be a tragedy.”

“I’m afraid not,” explains the exalted businessman. “That’s what we would call a great loss.”

The room goes silent. No other children volunteer. Mr. Trump searches the room.

“Isn’t there someone here who can give me an example of a tragedy?”

Finally at the back of the room, a boy raises his hand. In a quiet voice he says: “If a private jet carrying you was struck by a missile and blown to smithereens, that would be a tragedy.”

“Fantastic!” exclaims Mr. Trump, “That’s absolutely right. And can you tell me why that would be a tragedy?”

“Well,” says the boy, “because it wouldn’t be a great loss and it probably wouldn’t be an accident either.”

(Copied from Quora)
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Image by Artsss from Pixabay