Working Towards the Master Race

Saw this meme on Facebook:

Get Sicker

Die Quicker

TRUMPCARE
Weeding Out the Undesirable Citizens

 

 

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41 thoughts on “Working Towards the Master Race

  1. I just wrote to a friend in California last night about this new Health Care Bill. My comment was as follows: “At least he won’t have to round up people for camps”. How ominous. And how terribly tragic. 😦

    Liked by 6 people

  2. Because tRump is at the forefront of the popular (Twitt-a-fied) sociopolitical bullying and moral castigation that has taken hold a substantial portion of the American voters and political supporters/activists on the Right and the anti-Dem Moderates, our influential Intellectuals of the country will hopefully step-up, organize, and counter-balance the divisive tribalism that is occuring. From a fabulous article I just read this morning…

    The potential market for intelligent discussion is greater than ever. Over a third of the adult U.S. population holds four-year degrees—an all-time high. And because the number of graduates who are women or African-American or Hispanic has increased dramatically, today’s public intellectuals look different from the old days. It’s no accident that some of our fastest-rising intellectual powerhouses are people of color, such as Ta-Nehisi Coates and Roxane Gay.

    http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/what-happened-americas-public-intellectuals-180963668/

    I must say that I’m not so ‘encouraged’ by “Over a third of the adult U.S. population holds four-year degrees — an all-time high” because the reciprocal of that is quite sad and discouraging for the mere fact that one of the wealthiest nations in the world post-WW2 has OVER 67% of its population with only high-school diplomas, or worse, after 72-years! Seven decades is MORE THAN ENOUGH time to have TWO-THIRDS minimum of your national population with bachelor degrees! Quality higher education offers at the very LEAST skills and tools for critical-thinking, writing, expressing, articulating, LISTENING, comparing, contrasting, evaluating, effective organizing, scrutinizing, questioning, abstract as well as factual cognitive recognitions, incessant curiosity, etc, etc, which one simply cannot comprehensively achieve (in modern times) with a small local diploma! Period! All of these under-grad and post-grad skills and tools MUST be utilized when we are now dealing with modern special-interest corporate governance.

    The alternative? Manufacture (spit out) propaganda recepticles (citizens) who are not skilled or experienced enough to decipher the manufacturing machines, CPUs, and their specific components and programs.

    Great meme by the way Nan. 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    • One must remember, Professor, that the $$$ one has to pay to achieve those four-year degrees has increased significantly. So while it is disheartening, it is also a “fact of life” in today’s society.

      Thanks for the compliment. ❤ I thought it was very apropos.

      Liked by 3 people

      • Oh yes! You are absolutely correct Nan! For the sake of time and blouted comment-threads, I skipped that significant factor out of courtesy. I’m so glad you mentioned it. If I may ride your coat-tails…

        In an unfettered free-enterprise economy, EVERYTHING is for sale, or more accurately: for lifelong(?) indebtedness, but certainly for those who can “afford it” and are not born into DISadvantaged homes/parents within poor-to-average PUBLIC education systems. And concurrently, primary and secondary private education is also for the well-to-do families, yet are almost exclusively religiously affiliated. Those school systems have their own attached strings too. Fyi, for the last several decades federal and state college GRANTS (versus loans) have steadily become non-existent. These conditions, and more, are a result of old guard hyper-capitalism and hyper-commercialism, which in turn feeds inequality on many levels. Eventually what happens — as we are seeing now; to your meme — are blatant and subtle forms of “weeding out undesirables” under the guise of weak will-power and lack of “good ole American drive and know how.” Pffffffffft!

        What America’s 1% – 10% never realize until it’s too late, or deny until it’s too late is that under the framework of hyper-capitalism, hyper-commercialism lies a huge calm teddy-bear OR a famished angry grizzly bear: the masses, the marginalized, the disadvantaged. Which bear should be cared for and nourished?

        So, great point Nan! Thank you. ❤

        Liked by 2 people

    • “Quality higher education offers at the very LEAST skills and tools for critical-thinking, writing, expressing, articulating, LISTENING, comparing, contrasting, evaluating, effective organizing, scrutinizing, questioning, abstract as well as factual cognitive recognitions, incessant curiosity, etc, etc, which one simply cannot comprehensively achieve (in modern times) with a small local diploma! Period!”

      This cracked me up. 😀

      PT, I’ve worked with some real idiots with college degrees. Real idiots with college degrees are ruining this country ATM. Nan brings up a good point about the cost one has to pay to achieve a 4 year degree, as noted in this link. http://fundersandfounders.com/entrepreneurs-who-dropped-out/

      I think it’s also worth noting that employers don’t want to train employees anymore. Btw,

      Entrepreneurs who dropped out of college:

      Michael Dell, Dell founder
      Steve Jobs, Apple founder
      Julian Assange, Wikileaks founder
      Bill Gates, Microsoft founder
      Evan Williams, Twitter co-founder
      Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook founder
      Larry Ellison, Oracle founder
      Jan Koum, WhatsApp founder
      Travis Kalanick, Uber founder
      John Mackey, Whole Foods founder

      Today, a person can’t even get a receptionist job without an associates degree. It’s just idiotic. Period!

      Liked by 2 people

      • Victoria,

        Yes, your point(s) are certainly valid. (gives a warm thumbs-up) You’ve shot a hole into my grossly oversimplified comment that warrants refining. Thank you. 😉 I often struggle with whether to go into a needed dissertation on a subject and its influencing factors, or amputate, condense, and generalize into a grossly(?) diluted comment on a subject. Here, I tried to find something in between at the expense of other valid points, including yours. I find in this pluralistic neverending diverse existence we have to be ABUNDANT in exceptions! HAH! And those listed entrepreneurs and their “success” stories are interesting; proverbial rags-to-riches-you-can-do-anything rally for sure. Nothing inherently wrong with that. It serves my humanistic ideals. ❤

        However, those "stories" deserve closer examination with many lenses. Interestingly enough, every one of those entrepreneurs listed are caucasin. All of them with the exception of John Mackey are successful in the tech-industries which unsurprisingly, given their blossoming-times, was the 80’s and early 90’s tech boom and world-wide-web boom during and after Reaganomics. And the fact that all of them were admitted into universities such as Stanford, UT-Austin, UCLA, San Jose State — not easy to enter by any means — tells another “story” too I’m sure, like WHERE their primary and secondary educations took place and how. And let’s not forget John McAfee in that list too! 😉 😛

        Furthermore, I’m interested in knowing what a highly specialized collegiate or trade-school degree offers for civic responsibilities within an enormously diverse populace versus a broad extensive PUBLIC 4-year degree which includes the humanities, fine arts, and say general-basic psychology and social-sciences along with any chosen specializations? Then… lets add world travel… to a minimum 10 different countries on 3 or 4 different continents. Many 4-year and post-grad programs do this. These are just my first questions/ideas into these “stories” of white (male?) entrepreneurs. And “success” should also be qualified, of course, along with “happiness” and “philanthropy.”

        Also, why did that one particular part crack you up? Hahaha.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Please understand, I’m not dissing higher education. I’m just pointing out that having a degree is not indicative of intelligence, potentiality and success.

          Btw,

          Alexander Hamilton only had one year of college.

          George Washington didn’t attend college.

          Benjamin Franklin didn’t attend college.

          Yeah, yeah, yeah, they were white dudes. :p

          Also, why did that one particular part crack you up?

          You answered your own question in your reply to me. 😉

          “like WHERE their primary and secondary educations took place and how.

          Let’s not leave out the primary caregiver’s involvement before formal schooling.

          You said that only “quality higher education offered, at the very LEAST, skills and tools for critical-thinking, writing, expressing, articulating, LISTENING, comparing, contrasting, evaluating, effective organizing, scrutinizing, questioning, abstract as well as factual cognitive recognitions, incessant curiosity, etc, etc, which one simply cannot comprehensively achieve (in modern times) with a small local diploma!”

          I respectfully disagree. Btw, I do appreciate your overall point(s). I just think we have to be careful about assuming that these skills and tools can only be acquired, comprehensively, in university settings. It can lead to stigmatization and, dare I say, unemployment.

          Liked by 2 people

        • I don’t generally disagree with your point-of-view and assertion Victoria — it absolutely has its merits, certainly within familial DNA/genetics and street-smart life-lessons — because your challenge was made true by those list of entrepreneural men. Great point! I guess what I would ask those entrepreneurs is “Would you be a BETTER, wiser, respected(?), educated more well-rounded success (on a HUMAN level) had you gone through subjects and obtained a degree you couldn’t otherwise achieve (by peers) solo?

          Street-smarts certainly has its merits, but I feel street-smarts combined with an accredited high-quality under-grad or post-grad degree more often than not carries with it access to Expertise. A BROAD under-grad/post-grad curriculum might be MANY feathers in one’s cap that at least demands a group’s consideration, more so than a high school diploma. Hope that better clarifies my inferences. 🙂

          Like

        • PT, I’m not talking about street smarts. For example:

          “Employers are raising their educational requirements for new hires, a trend that troubles workforce development experts who say it puts jobs out of reach of those who need them most.

          Thirty-seven percent of companies say they hire college graduates for positions that in the past were primarily held by people with only high school degrees, and 26 percent say they hire people with master’s degrees for jobs that used to go to candidates with bachelor’s degrees. . . .

          Workforce development experts say the findings are troubling, though unsurprising, as they see firsthand the narrowing employment options for people without college degrees. . . .

          “It is particularly concerning to our economy because it is yet another signal of the shrinking middle class and continued bifurcation of our economy” said Marie Lynch, president and CEO of Skills for Chicagoland’s Future, a public-private partnership that matches businesses who have unmet hiring needs with unemployed or underemployed job seekers. . . .

          Matt Muench, senior program officer in the employment program at the Joyce Foundation, said employers often use college experience as an easy way to winnow down large applicant pools and as a “crude proxy” for soft skills, but as a result overlook qualified people who have those same skills, if not a diploma.

          Such “credential creep” compounds inequities, drives people to pay for degrees they can’t always afford and perpetuates a cycle of ever-heightening education standards, he said, all amid ballooning tuition costs and student debt. . . .

          “It’s the price of admission to pass through the screen but then they are not that much more prepared for these jobs,” Muench said. . . .

          Muench said a promising solution is for employers to adopt skills-based hiring and broaden their perspective of who can do the job.”

          Now, if you make it difficult for the non-affluent people to afford college (a master races wet dream come true), or they can’t afford to go back to school to get a masters, when just 2 weeks ago, a 4 year degree with just fine, even when those who are doing the SAME job using the SAME skills as those with college, you further create inequality.

          My brother was trained by someone who had a 2 year degree. She was topnotch at her job. So why was she training him? Because he was replacing her. Why? He had 4 years of college, even though she had far more experience and skills for that position.

          My daughter was just laid off her dream job which she was deeply devoted to. She had an associates degree and years of OTJ Marketing training. Why was she laid off even though she ranked #3 in the region? Because the new management decided that her position now requires a 4 year degree in Marketing.

          “Credential creep.”

          This is why I called you out on your assertion that bigger is better. No, not necessarily, and especially for middle-skill jobs, which make up about half the workforce. It’s hot how “big” it is, but how you “use” it that counts. Right? *wink wink* :p

          Like

        • This subject is certainly deserving of extensive study, research, and understanding… for the greater good for the greatest number. I am not doing it full justice here. I agree with much of your points!

          I guess what I was implying with street smarts was a level of education/experience, parenting(?), and demographics not gained by a standardized national under-grad or post-grad accreditation. I think/feel one should try to have both, if possible, for several reasons. But like Nan pointed out, I and many Americans cannot finish my Master’s degree (or start one) because as a white-male (with a bachelors) I cannot afford the tuition or the long-term loan debt. For the last 7-10 years I have not been able to obtain any grants or low-interest loans that “other” applicants can and do receive. On the contrary, Nordic nations do NOT have this public problem! Hmmm. There are often exceptions and extenuating conditions in certain cases, yes. However, as a general rule a higher accreditation of learning does present additional benefits, for both employer and employee. One, for example, would be a wider deeper appreciation by fellow workers, lateral and upward supervisors/managers, and competitors for profits, expansion into new markets, and training of employees, to name three.

          Maybe another way to clarify my assertion would be in military training and combat. Soldiers highly trained in Special Ops and advanced specialized equipment/weapons and tactics have a much higher survival-success rate than those soldiers without or no-boot-camp training/education whatsoever. And toward an experience/street-smarts background, or combat experience in-the-field, that combination is LETHAL (successful!), so to speak. This most definitely applies to combat fighter pilots — the amount of training/education invested in those pilots makes it a no-brainer to protect and value them immensely for actual combat deployments AND training younger inexperienced rookie pilots! This higher education/experience model is the wiser M.O. for a nation and its stable future — to INVEST in its youth’s maturity, wisdom, and skill-sets… including ALL those less fortunate and without privilege.

          Sadly, the U.S. has become less and less vested in its youth, in equality/parity, and thus its future… and more and more for revenue and profits right now. 😦

          Like

        • Thanks for your reply. As I said in a previous post, I’m not dissing higher education. Not. At. All.

          So, you will eventually get laid off from your teaching job (which you are damn good at) because you don’t have a Masters, and can’t afford to go back to school, even though you are most likely more qualified, technically and experientially, than the squeaky green teacher, fresh out of college, who’s replacing you. (Run-on :P)

          I wholeheartedly agree that we have a huge problem in the U.S., and those who are skilled and technically qualified (whether they have degrees or not) are being devalued and discarded.

          I’m disheartened about your situation, and I can relate. Btw, according to an Oxford University study, approximately half of the US workforce will be replaced within the next 10 to 20 years by computer automation. The study identified more than 700 occupations at risk, including occupations that require advanced degrees.

          Liked by 1 person

        • I must agree with Professor Taboo here, Victoria. The issue isn’t that a person cannot become an informed productive citizen without higher education, it’s that many more people would if they had such an education.

          Liked by 1 person

        • “The issue isn’t that a person cannot become an informed productive citizen without higher education, it’s that many more people would if they had such an education.”

          “Credential creep.” (See my comment to PT.) 🙂

          Like

        • That was a very good Chicago Tribune article Victoria. Tells and reveals much about the job-market and who is hiring and for what positions. Do you think that if there were MUCH MORE companies/corporations competing with these current “credential creeping” hiring interviewers/managers of limited numbered opportunities, i.e. a much broader diverse job market, this “winnowing” would not be prevalent? In other words, in an Applicant’s market rather than an Employer’s market?

          Though many American corporations and small businesses will publicly support “competition” and the capitalistic free-enterprise system — naturally it has benefits for them… privately (and covertly via rigging the game & officiating) they want to eliminate competition, or parity. Would not 50%, 60%, 80% of all job-applicants with bachelors degrees or higher create MORE educated entrepreneurs hiring from MORE numbers of new companies/corporations, also creating an Applicant’s and Entrepreneurs market and more job opportunities? How much a company or corporation can attract and pay elite applicants would be primarily based upon their employee benefits as well as pay… another egalitarian principle. 🙂

          For me personally, I see these labor and economic conditions benefiting a less discriminatory egalitarian society rather than what you mentioned about your daughter: a plutarchy/oligarchy. Disparity. I can totally empathize with your daughter’s predicament. I was pushed aside in 1991 at Charter Hospital at my position in Clinical-Financial Assessment/Admissions because I did not (yet) have my Master’s degree & state license for that federal mandate… favoring (potential) mental-illness patients and their families. On one side of that “change” this forced more ethical practices and accountability by private corporate mental-health facilities and their staff admissions policies. Again, good for the needy mentally ill and their families.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Thanks so much for reading the article and for your feedback. Here’s my thinking, and this brings us back to Nan’s OP: with half of the workforce, possibly more, at risk of losing employment, etc., something’s got to give. I doubt that this administration is entertaining the idea of a basic income for those replaced by computer automation, or universal healthcare. It is certainly possible that a “culling of the herd” is on their agenda.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Yes. Agreed. Those who have been collegiately educated in business management – organizational dynamics (global/international in particular), AND computer-electronic engineering will most definitely have job-stability and opportunity for most of the foreseeable future! Other college-degreed fields I foresee having stability (and decent pay?) for the long-term are licensed psychologists and mental-illness professionals/therapists… because of many repercussions of what you mention: our current U.S. political tribal culture led by tRump and the GOP. :/

          Thank you so much Victoria for some great discussion and information! ❤

          Liked by 1 person

        • Victoria,

          >>> “Such “credential creep” compounds inequities, drives people to pay for degrees they can’t always afford and perpetuates a cycle of ever-heightening education standards, he said, all amid ballooning tuition costs and student debt. . . . ”

          Agreed, but this employment problem is a separate issue from the societal need to educate its citizens. As Thomas Jefferson advocated, a healthy democracy is dependent upon an informed and engaged populace. The best mechanism to achieve it is, by far, higher education. People, in general, have a much better chance of utilizing their creative and entrepreneurial energies through education; and, they have a much better chance of avoiding the dependent limitations of working as an employee. Furthermore, as you alluded to, the quality of life costs to individuals who don’t further their education is painfully evident (from: http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2014/02/11/the-rising-cost-of-not-going-to-college/):

          >>> “For those who question the value of college in this era of soaring student debt and high unemployment, the attitudes and experiences of today’s young adults—members of the so-called Millennial generation—provide a compelling answer. On virtually every measure of economic well-being and career attainment—from personal earnings to job satisfaction to the share employed full time—young college graduates are outperforming their peers with less education. And when today’s young adults are compared with previous generations, the disparity in economic outcomes between college graduates and those with a high school diploma or less formal schooling has never been greater in the modern era.”

          […]

          >>> “For example, among those ages 25 to 32, fully 22% with only a high school diploma are living in poverty, compared with 6% of today’s college-educated young adults. In contrast, only 7% of Baby Boomers who had only a high school diploma were in poverty in 1979 when they were in their late 20s and early 30s.”

          Poverty is a killer. Believe me, I know from personal experience. It robs people of their opportunities and their sense of worth. It destroys the lives of both the impoverished and those around them. A society with high or rising rates of poverty is a diseased one.

          Occupational training should be the responsibility of business. The education of citizens should be the responsibility of a nation through collective governance. Greedy corporations should never have been allowed to abrogate that responsibility beginning in the 1980s. Sorry for the rant.

          Liked by 2 people

        • You’ll get no argument from me, Bob, and I’ll reiterate, I’m not dissing higher education or its necessity in an extremely competitive, greed-driven world. My main beef was to not stigmatize by assuming that people lack these skill sets with a “small local diploma.”

          […critical-thinking, writing, expressing, articulating, LISTENING, comparing, contrasting, evaluating, effective organizing, scrutinizing, questioning, abstract as well as factual cognitive recognitions, incessant curiosity, etc, etc, which one simply cannot comprehensively achieve (in modern times) with a small local diploma! Period!

          Liked by 2 people

        • I too do not wish to stigmatize citizens with only a high school diploma or trade-school associates degree. Too many are understandably NOT able to access higher education degrees. Why? I think it is primarily due, for starters, to the upper 1%, 10%, and 20% (e.g. Koch brothers) looking out for their own political-civic interests (against competition & parity) at the expense of their nation’s welfare. The poor conditions of our country’s Education Level Attained (27% to at best 33%) is not a result of apathy or stupidity or a lack of patriotic drive — as many GOP leaders and their supporters scream — it is mostly due to the “game being rigged” by the networks of the 1% – 20% which heavily influence (control?) our “free-enterprise” economy and its major equations. This isn’t just my opinion, I summarize from Nobel Prize winners in economics Joseph Stiglitz and Paul Krugman.

          Therefore, the only ones who should feel stigmatized by my comment(s) are those who are extremely apathetic and highly unscrupulous; basically just don’t give a shit for anyone’s well-being. UnAmerican? 😛 😉

          Liked by 2 people

        • “it is mostly due to the “game being rigged” by the networks of the 1% – 20% which heavily influence (control?) our “free-enterprise” economy and its major equations.”

          Yep. Here’s a good read:

          “America: Abandon Your Reverence for the Bachelor’s Degree”

          “It is often said in the United States that no member of Congress or leading CEO started their career in a community-college technical-training program—pathways to positions of leadership start with a bachelor’s degree. Is this true because graduates of technical-training programs are not fit to become leaders, or because we don’t allow them to? Try saying the same thing to someone in Germany, Austria, or Switzerland. Many politicians, senior managers, and even CEOs have come up through those countries’ impressive vocational-training systems. The issue isn’t that a career that starts with technical training can’t lead to more advanced learning and skills. It is that our higher-education policies simply don’t allow for it—and that’s just a failure of imagination.”

          “https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2015/10/reverence-bachelors-degree/408346/

          Liked by 2 people

        • I liked this snippet of that same article:

          …on average, people with bachelor’s degrees fare better than their counterparts on just about every measure that matters: they earn more money, are less likely to be unemployed, and like their jobs better. Bachelor’s degree holders are simply better positioned to weather recessions, execute career transitions, acquire new skills with the support of their employers, and be promoted. While a bachelor’s degree is far from a guarantee of career success or economic security today, it is still the best insurance against poverty and insecurity that one can get.

          And despite that not all graduates of 4-year (or 6-to-9 year) degrees may NOT have advanced knowledge in political science, or law, biology, genetics, embryology (for women’s rights!), climatology, paleontology, paleography, or archaeology, in light of our current polarized political culture… on average they are better equipped to do the necessary authentic leg-work to study, examine, reexamine, and form plausible theories or conclusions, tempory or not. Why? One answer is that according to an academic accredited multi-person panel, a graduate completes necessary advanced courses rather than being self-appointed or appointed by one’s family. The wider the reputable accredited panel of academics, or scientists, or doctors, experts in the field, the more valued the degree achieved.

          Granted, there will be college-grads that slip through the cracks — e.g. from Fordham University & Wharton School Univ. Pennsylvania! Geeeezzzz. o_O

          Nevertheless, whether the entire degree process is or has been ethically flawed the last 30-40 years is certainly up for good debate! Hahaha! HOWEVER, as the quote above alludes to, in the U.S. under-grads and post-grads on average do garner more serious consideration, more respect, and more opportunities — monetarily and prestigiously — than lower degrees or diplomas. I don’t necessarily like it when as a whole/nation entry, curriculums, and “credentials” are so ungenerously awarded compared to several northern European nations, but that disparity is a result of socioeconomic and political factors here… not the value (or lack thereof) of the degrees and the hardwork it took to obtain them.

          And I too want to reiterate that I’m NOT aiming to stigmatize those truly disadvantaged or that are victims of higher game-rigging. Those are very real (disturbing?) conditions in this “Land of Opportunity(?)”! Hahaha.

          Knowing you as and how I do Victoria, I sure am glad we agree on many/several key points about this country and the Bible-belt-South and (raises hands to the sky & thanks his stars!) that we are not arch enemies! Hahaha! 😛

          Liked by 2 people

        • “Bachelor’s degree holders are simply better positioned to weather recessions, execute career transitions, acquire new skills with the support of their employers, and be promoted.”

          For now, at least. In 10+ years, according to the Oxford University study, it’s questionable whether they will weather the transition to computer automation, and be supported and promoted by their employers.

          “and (raises hands to the sky & thanks his stars!) that we are not arch enemies! Hahaha!”

          I couldn’t agree more. I’m not the one with whips, collars and chains. 😉 😛

          Liked by 2 people

        • Stated very well Robert. I especially like and agree with your last paragraph! Reaganomics and Citizens United: two egregious legislations/acts/movements which greatly benefit million- and billion-dollar corporation interest’s (e.g. Koch brothers & MIT grads) at the horrible expense of individual citizens and their protections. 😦

          In order to know HOW BEST to fight your enemy/competition, you must learn their methods, their tactics, their thinking in order to counter and retort… hopefully to a highly-educated (MIT?) audience of citizens. 😉

          Liked by 1 person

  3. Well, you might have just seen the breaking news, but looks like the Senate has canceled the healthcare vote. At least there are a few Republicans who don’t want to commit political career suicide.

    Liked by 3 people

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