Reblog: Restoring Some Humanity To The Refugee Debate

This is a post that needs to be read by everyone, but especially those who support the Muslim (not immigration/refugee) ban.

Whistling In The Wind

I’ve noticed that most discussions about the refugee crisis discuss the issue in a very abstract way. The proposals are spoken of in a technical and hypothetical manner relating to various treaties, agreements and EU regulations, as well as figures about what may or may not happen. The discussion revolves around quotas and flows, as if refugees were something that come out of the tap. Even worse still, many opponents to refugee resettlement take a simplistic view of “Us versus Them”. “We” have a common culture and heritage that is apparently under attack. “They” are a strange foreign thing, incompatible with us.

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13 thoughts on “Reblog: Restoring Some Humanity To The Refugee Debate

  1. Most people in the West have never met a Muslim

    No. Not most people.

    1) I grew up with them and worked with them.

    2) My partner didn’t. He has since worked with loads (Moroccans) who he considers good colleagues.

    3) The area I grew up in now has a Sharia Court, a no-go zone for whites, had very nasty riots, and has produced home-grown terrorists. Say third generation? And that, is the worry.

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    • I have no doubt there are many who have had less-than-favorable encounters with Muslims, just as they have with individuals of other colors, nationalities, beliefs … even the homeless. But does this mean we lump them all together and shun them?

      I think the point the writer was trying to put across is we are all human beings and it’s unfair to judge those everyone that happens to fall outside our comfort zone.

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        • You may be right. But I wonder how many of the “anti-Muslim” group even realized the person they met/associated with was a Muslim? Many look no different that anyone else except perhaps a slightly darker skin tone … and sometimes that’s not even a defining factor. And not all wear distinctive clothing. Yet they are all lumped together by prejudice simply because they happen to claim they are Muslim.

          Liked by 1 person

  2. I left a comment on Mr. Nielsen’s post complimenting his work. Since I’ve done that I’ll just leave these two quotes here Nan, if I may…

    Ignorance is preferable to error; and he is less remote from the truth who believes nothing, than he who believes what is wrong.” — Thomas Jefferson (1785)

    Ignorance is king, many would not prosper by its abdication.” — Walter M. Miller (1959)

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Nan I was at University I was friendly with an Indian Student who was Muslim. Then many years later I recruited a Muslim from Bangladesh as an employee. He was an excellent employee.

    Having said all of that I still get very nervous in allowing widespread Muslim immigration as I see the religion itself as toxic as the Wahhabism influence spreads. I consider that all western countries should take a pause and think long and hard about the long term impact of Muslim immigration. In Australia where I live it is the second and third generation immigrants who are more likely to support terrorism.

    My concern is that Islam is changing it is becoming more radical as the influence of Wahhabism spreads. We have seen that in Indonesia north of here, where the radical fringe is becoming more and more powerful. Indonesia was once known for tolerance but that has changed dramatically in only one generation.

    I know you won’t agree with me. But Islam worries me in the long term, every Islamic majority country I am aware of persecutes non Muslims.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Peter, I know there are many who share your concerns. And there’s probably more validity to them that we realize … or want to accept. But I guess I’m one of those people who wants to put the Human Being first, rather than their beliefs. It may not be the best — or safest — perspective, but it’s a difficult one for me to overcome. I guess it goes back to what I’ve said related to this whole tRump event … until it hits you personally (and where it hurts), it’s easy to overlook everything else.

      I suppose I still see some things through my old Christian rose-colored glasses

      Liked by 1 person

    • From Wikipedia: The majority of mainstream Sunni and Shia Muslims worldwide strongly disagree with the interpretation of Wahhabism and consider it a “vile sect”. Islamic scholars, including those from the Al-Azhar University, regularly denounce Wahhabism with terms such as “Satanic faith”.

      This reminds me of the off-shoot beliefs/practices of some Christian sects.

      Google also says it is “a puritanical form of Sunni Islam and is practiced in. Saudi Arabia” — yet, as we know, the ban is not against anyone from Saudi Arabia.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Peter, I have to agree with you in a general sense. I personally find the same intolerance (versus indifference) within all three Abrahamic religions. This tells me it is serious flaws in the ideology, the theology, and the suppression and distortion of non-Abrahamic educations. It is a complete mystery to me WHY this hasn’t been identified the last 2-3 millenia. Nevertheless, I think I disagree with you in a one-on-one basis.

      It has been my experience on an individual level with radicalized (militarized) sects/cults inside the three Abrahamic religions… the majority of “terrorists” come from impoverished poorly educated families and lives desperately seeking purpose, meaning, and relief from a cruel uncertain existence and future — a “no way out” mentality, if you will. In other words, there will never be any reason to continue living on this Earth this way. This is actually a pathology several millenia old.

      The sadder fact is that all three Abrahamic religion’s sacred manuscripts have far too many passages and historical exegesis that either explicitly or implicitly teaches violence/murder/genocide — which all stems from a HIGHLY JEALOUS (Abrahamic) diety — all taught generation after generation after generation, ad nauseum! It is ideological in a general sense, economic-psychological in a specific individual sense… in my opinion. 😉

      Liked by 2 people

        • Oh MY Nan, you couldn’t be more spot on!!! And my next question to you — following your lead 😉 — would be And how can we properly identify those persons… in dignifying empathetic ways?

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        • Well of course you simply take your lead from tRump and call them all bad! You know, because he’s like a smart person and knows all the answers to such ass-toot astute questions.

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  4. My take on this issue that is hardly new, is that as it is practically impossible to identify potential terrorists or radical Islamic preachers as we have discovered. What is obvious is the lack of action against immigrants by supporting the host countries laws and ethics by the already residential, homegrown and ethnic moderate Islamic Muslims.

    The immigrant Muslims are radicalising the young Muslims and abusing our laws so if they are not bought into line by these moderate resident Muslims what choice do Western countries have if they want to keep their residents safe?

    I can imagine if you knew of a criminal element moving into a law-abiding street near you, the residents would be onto their case with calls to the police if there was a single step out of line.

    This Islamic religion has such a hold on Muslim people either through indoctrination of the ideology or they are so consumed by fear that it will have good moderate Muslims ignoring the crimes they know about and avoiding the reporting of criminal behaviour to the police.

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