The Book: Why I Believed

I’m currently reading an excellent book written by a former Christian who ‘believed’ for nearly three decades. In fact, at one time he served as a pastor and missionary so when he left ‘the faith,’ it was not a snap decision.

The writer has expressed many of my own ‘conscious’ thoughts and has also brought many of my ‘dormant’ persuasions to the forefront as well.

The book is titled “Why I Believed: Confessions of a Former Missionary” and was written by Kenneth W. Daniels. It is available to read online, or you can also purchase it as a paperback or ebook. Proceeds go to Doctors Without Borders, PATH, and UNICEF.

Last night, I came across a portion that jumped off the page at me. In my opinion, it describes many in the Christian faith today:

It is comforting to be able to look upon others more conservative or fanatical than we are and to believe our religion — or our particular version of it — to be more urbane and less prone to excess. Thus, the killing of infidels is now seen primarily as a Muslim practice, even though in times past it was a Catholic, Protestant and Jewish practice also, supported by various biblical texts.

I would add that not only in times past, but also in the current day, there are those in the Christian faith who feel that killing people who disagree with their interpretation of biblical texts is justified.

If you are someone who is confused or unsettled about your Christian faith, I urge you to investigate this book. This writer has not set out to ‘slam’ Christians. Rather, he humbly takes readers along on his journey from evangelical missionary to secular humanist. He urges those in the faith to closely examine what they believe and, more importantly, why they believe as they do. He asks that they be open to new ideas and even to consider that their belief system might be a mistake.

P.S. The book has been rated 4.5 stars at Amazon.

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4 thoughts on “The Book: Why I Believed

  1. …..If you are someone who is <>, I urge you to investigate this book. This writer has not set out to ‘slam’ Christians. Rather, he humbly takes readers along on his journey from evangelical missionary to secular humanist. He urges those in the faith to closely <>. He asks that they be <>…..
    – – –
    The brackets are mine. I think that the reception of religious concepts, presented by parents and teachers and other elders in your childhood, depends on your mindset: If you accept those ideas without questioning, you will quickly be trained to have faith, i.e. to believe everything they say. Why not?
    But if your mindset urges you to tell the difference between nature and supernature, it will enable you reject faith and to embrace reasoning about the universe and mankind. That is so heartwarming; believers will not believe what they are missing!

    I hope there will be many persons with a faltering religious belief, although I doubt it. Faith is so easily hammered into the brains of believers that they are soon afraid, or ashamed, or both, to admit that their system might be a mistake.

    An attractive topic, Nan!

    Federico

    Like

    • I totally agree that most values are set during childhood. I know I implanted Christian ideals in my children when they were young by making sure they attended Sunday School and church. Now that I no longer believe in Christianity, they find it difficult to understand where I’m coming from.

      It’s too bad parents don’t give their children more freedom to make their own choices.

      Your last sentence about being afraid, ashamed, etc. speaks volumes!

      Thank you, once again, for stopping by and leaving your words of wisdom.

      P.S. I deleted your other post since this one showed up without any problem.

      Like

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